The life and bacground of gustave flaubert and henrik ibsen

He is also referred as the father of realism. After Shakespearehe is considered as the second most influential and insightful dramatist and poet of the 19th century.

The life and bacground of gustave flaubert and henrik ibsen

Act One[ edit ] The play opens at Christmas time as Nora Helmer enters her home carrying many packages. Nora's husband Torvald is working in his study when she arrives.

He playfully rebukes her for spending so much money on Christmas gifts, calling her his "little squirrel. This year Torvald is due a promotion at the bank where he works, so Nora feels that they can let themselves go a little.

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The maid announces two visitors: Kristine Linde, an old friend of Nora's, who has come seeking employment; and Dr. Rank, a close friend of the family, who is let into the study.

Kristine has had a difficult few years, ever since her husband died leaving her with no money or children. Nora says that things have not been easy for them either: Torvald became sick, and they had to travel to Italy so he could recover. Kristine explains that when her mother was ill she had to take care of her brothers, but now that they are grown she feels her life is "unspeakably empty.

Kristine gently tells Nora that she is like a child. Nora is offended, so she teases the idea that she got money from "some admirer," so they could travel to Italy to improve Torvald's health.

She told Torvald that her father gave her the money, but in fact she managed to illegally borrow it without his knowledge because women couldn't do anything economical like signing checks without their husband. Over the years, she has been secretly working and saving up to pay it off.

Biography of Henrik Ibsen - caninariojana.com

Krogstad, a lower-level employee at Torvald's bank, arrives and goes into the study. Nora is clearly uneasy when she sees him. Rank leaves the study and mentions that he feels wretched, though like everyone he wants to go on living.

The life and bacground of gustave flaubert and henrik ibsen

In contrast to his physical illness, he says that the man in the study, Krogstad, is "morally diseased. Nora asks him if he can give Kristine a position at the bank and Torvald is very positive, saying that this is a fortunate moment, as a position has just become available.

Torvald, Kristine, and Dr. Rank leave the house, leaving Nora alone. The nanny returns with the children and Nora plays with them for a while until Krogstad creeps into the living room and surprises her.

Krogstad tells Nora that Torvald intends to fire him at the bank and asks her to intercede with Torvald to allow him to keep his job. She refuses, and Krogstad threatens to blackmail her about the loan she took out for the trip to Italy; he knows that she obtained this loan by forging her father's signature.

Krogstad leaves and when Torvald returns, Nora tries to convince him not to fire Krogstad. Torvald refuses to hear her pleas, explaining that Krogstad is a liar and a hypocrite and that he committed a terrible crime: Torvald feels physically ill in the presence of a man "poisoning his own children with lies and dissimulation.

Torvald returns from the bank, and Nora pleads with him to reinstate Krogstad, claiming she is worried Krogstad will publish libelous articles about Torvald and ruin his career.

Torvald dismisses her fears and explains that, although Krogstad is a good worker and seems to have turned his life around, he must be fired because he is not deferential enough to Torvald in front of other bank personnel. Torvald then retires to his study to work. Rank, the family friend, arrives.

Nora asks him for a favor, but Rank responds by revealing that he has entered the terminal stage of tuberculosis of the spine and that he has always been secretly in love with her.

Nora tries to deny the first revelation and make light of it but is more disturbed by his declaration of love. She tries clumsily to tell him that she is not in love with him but that she loves him dearly as a friend.

Desperate after being fired by Torvald, Krogstad arrives at the house. Rank to go into Torvald's study so he will not see Krogstad. When Krogstad confronts Nora, he declares that he no longer cares about the remaining balance of Nora's loan, but that he will instead preserve the associated bond to blackmail Torvald into not only keeping him employed but also promoting him.

Nora explains that she has done her best to persuade her husband, but he refuses to change his mind. Krogstad informs Nora that he has written a letter detailing her crime forging her father's signature of surety on the bond and put it in Torvald's mailbox, which is locked.

Nora tells Kristine of her difficult situation. Having had a relationship with Krogstad in the past before her marriage, Kristine says that they are still in love and promises to try to convince him to relent.

Torvald enters and tries to retrieve his mail, but Nora distracts him by begging him to help her with the dance she has been rehearsing for the costume party, feigning anxiety about performing.

She dances so badly and acts so childishly that Torvald agrees to spend the whole evening coaching her. When the others go to dinner, Nora stays behind for a few minutes and contemplates killing herself to save her husband from the shame of the revelation of her crime and to pre-empt any gallant gesture on his part to save her reputation.In these three unforgettably intense plays, Henrik Ibsen explores the problems of personal and social morality that he perceived in the world around him and, in particular, the complex nature of truth.

Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary on Film The figure of Emma Bovary, the central character of Gustave Flaubert's novel, Madame Bovary, caused both cheers of approval and howls of outrage upon its publication, and continues to fascinate modern literary critics and film makers. UNESCO has inscribed Ibsen's autographed manuscripts of A Doll's House on the Memory of the World Register in , in recognition of their historical value.

[5] The title of the play is most commonly translated as A Doll's House, though some scholars use A Doll House. Real life though he just left town and turned his experiences into a novel Henrik Ibsen. Realism,-Norwegian playwright-Wrote, "A Doll's House"-Nora, patronized and humiliated, treated like a child, or a doll by her husband Gustave Flaubert.

Realism,-novelist. Throughout Hedda Gabler and Madame Bovary death is a common motif. The use of unnatural death by Henrik Ibsen and Gustave Flaubert allows the authors to breakdown the main characters and reveal their true personalities.4/4(1). Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary both portray significant female characters.

Both of these works show 19th Century women striving for freedom. These works reveal the problems women of this time had in trying to become equal with their male counterpart.

Gustave Flaubert - Wikipedia